Resource of the week: New RefWorks

This week’s Resource of the Week is the new version of RefWorks.

RefWorks has recently gone through an upgrade to imporve the interface and also add some extra features. You can continue to use RefWorks (Legacy) or feel free to give RefWorks (New) a try. Some new features include being able to read documents within RefWorks and the ability to highlight and add notes to these documents

RefWorks is a web-based tool that is free to use for all staff and students. It will help you to capture, save, organise references and create bibliographies using a range of different referencing styles. You can also link it to Word and Google Docs so you can insert citations as you type and also create your bibliography within your essay.

How do I access it?

  1. Go to the Citing and Referencing Tab on your subject guide
  2. Click on “New RefWorks” from the drop down
  3. Create an account (you must use your College email address)

If you have used the previous version of RefWorks and would like to migrate your content to RefWorks (New) you can watch the short video below to find out how.

Using RefWorks

You can import information on resources from databases like Library Search, JSTOR, Science Direct and many others. Most databases will have an export to RefWorks option, for websites you can use the Ref-GrabIt tool

You will then see the option to save to RefWorks Legacy or RefWorks New, ensure you select RefWorks New.

new refworks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RefWorks creates a database of your references and you can organise these by folder.

folders

 

 

 

 

 

Use RefWorks to generate an automatic bibliography. You can insert citations and bibliography directly in your assignment using the Write and Cite tool for Word and Google Docs.

Further Help

 

How do I cite a Kindle book?

Other e-readers are available…

Kindle

We were only able to find guidance for a couple of the popular referencing styles, but hopefully this will give you an idea of what to do next! Link to any good resources in the comments, and we’ll tweet them.

APA referencing:

Gladwell, M. (2008). Outliers: The story of success [Kindle DX version]. 
 Retrieved from Amazon.com

http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/09/how-do-i-cite-a-kindle.html

Harvard:

Patterson, M. 2012. Lost places in dreams. [Kindle DX version] Transworld Media. Available at: Amazon.co.uk <http:// www.amazon.co.uk> [Accessed 9 June 2012].

http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

If you use another e-reader, put details of the version you have read in the [square brackets] instead.

What about in the text?

APA:

In the text, however, citation can get confusing because e-books often lack page numbers (though PDF versions may have them). Kindle books have “location numbers,” which are static, but those are useless to anyone who doesn’t have a Kindle too. To cite in text, either (a) paraphrase, thus avoiding the problem (e.g., “Gladwell, 2008”), or (b) utilize APA’s guidelines for direct quotations of online material without pagination (see Section 6.05 of the manual). Name the major sections (chapter, section, and paragraph number; abbreviate if titles are long), like you would do if you were citing the Bible or Shakespeare.

Gladwell’s book has numbered chapters, and he’s numbered the sections in the chapters. An example direct quotation might be this:

One of the author’s main points is that “people don’t rise from nothing” 
(Gladwell, 2008, Chapter 1, Section 2, para. 5)

 

http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/09/how-do-i-cite-a-kindle.html

Harvard:

If you include a quotation from an ebook without page numbers, use the section heading or chapter heading as a guide to locating your quotation, if available.

http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

Shelf-Help: helps you to understand & manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading

We all need a little help sometimes. It might be to make sense of things happening to us or a friend. The library has collected together books from the Reading well Books on Prescription list to help everyone in the college who wants a little Shelf-help.

The list of books is available here. There is a mix of ebooks and print books available.

How are the books selected?

The books for the lists were selected using an evidence-based approach supported by a rigorous process of consultation and expert advice. The titles have all been recommended by experts as useful, effective and accessible and tried and tested by people with lived experience.

How to get the most from the books

Respected professionals with relevant experience have produced guides to help people get the most out of the reading recommended by Reading Well Books on Prescription.

Common mental health conditions:

https://readingagency.org.uk/adults/Reading%20Well%20Making%20the%20most%20of%20your%20book.pdf

A final word from the Library We hope that this book will help you, but please help us by not writing in it! It can be very tempting when you find an idea that you want to highlight, or a worksheet that you want to fill in. It’s ok to photocopy a few pages for your own use.

Resource of the week: Bloomberg and BMC

2000px-Bloomberg_logo.svg

This week we’re teaming up with Careers to promote Bloomberg, as part of Business and Finance Week, 9th – 13th October. This month, Careers also have a challenge to complete an online course, Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC), to learn more about Bloomberg and how the world of finance operates.

Bloomberg is a financial database that was created in the early 1980s. It’s interface is quite reminiscent of this decade, but don’t let that put you off! It is a super powerful resource that can provide a whole range of information.

Bloomberg login

If Bloomberg looks familiar, that’s because you’ve probably seen it on TV and film! In fact, in the past decade it’s starred alongside Kevin Spacey (Margin Call) and Christian Bale (The Big Short).

Unlike other resources, Bloomberg is only available on certain PCs around campus.  Bloomberg terminals can be identified by the keyboard, as shown below. This special keyboard has shortcut keys to make searching simpler.

bloomberg-keyboard-4-uk-cropped

Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is a self-paced e-learning course that takes about 8 hours to complete. You can take for free on the Bloomberg terminals. It will introduce you to financial markets and some of the key functions on Bloomberg. Once completed, you will get a certificate, which you can use on your CV and LinkedIn profile. If you complete it during October, you will also get passport points, as it is the Passport Challenge for this month. If you are unsure where to start, please come to a Bloomberg Basics session in the Library, which are taking place 8am to 9am, 10th to 13th October. These will help you create a Bloomberg account and register for the BMC.

Sian Downes and Emma Burnett, Information Consultants from the Library, provide help and support with Bloomberg all year round, including training.

 

Resources of the Week: Box of Broadcast & Kanopy

Box of Broadcast (BoB): On Demand TV & Radio for Education

Our resource of the week this week is Box of Broadcasts (BoB).  BoB allows users to record items broadcast on over 65 free to air channels including BBC channels, ITV, Film 4, and 10 foreign language channels.

You can request up to 10 items a day to be recorded and added to BoB. The 9 most popular channels are listed first and programmes aired on these will be immediately recorded and added to BoB. If you would like programmes from other channels you can  request these within 30 dys of broadcast. You can also request programmes up to seven days in advance.

BoB is therefore a really good catch up service and there is no need for a TV license as the University has a license which allows students to access content via BoB.

BoB also has an archive of over 2 million broadcasts that date back to the 1990s, these include TV programmes, documentaries, films and radio broadcasts. You can also make your own playlists and create clips.

Access BoB via our eResources A-Z page.

KanopyKanopy

Kanopy is another great resource for watching films and documentaries online, again you don’t need a TV license to access this!

It provides access to over 6,000 videos on a range of different subjects including humanities, education, the arts, business, health and sciences.

Also included are a lot of Hollywood films, British Cinema, international cinema and also early cinema.

This is a great resource and is again free to use, access Kanopy via our eResources A-Z page.

If you would like to learn about these resources or any others please contact your information consultant 

Resource of the week – Box of Broadcast

BoB and kanopy

Box of Broadcast (BoB): On Demand TV & Radio for Education

Our resource of the week this week is Box of Broadcasts (BoB).  BoB allows users to record items broadcast on over 65 free to air channels including BBC channels, ITV, Film 4, and 10 foreign language channels.

You can request up to 10 items a day to be recorded and added to BoB. The 9 most popular channels are listed first and programmes aired on these will be immediately recorded and added to BoB. If you would like programmes from other channels you can  request these within 30 dys of broadcast. You can also request programmes up to seven days in advance.

BoB is therefore a really good catch up service and there is no need for a TV license as the University has a license which allows students to access content via BoB.

BoB also has an archive of over 2 million broadcasts that date back to the 1990s, these include TV programmes, documentaries, films and radio broadcasts. You can also make your own playlists and create clips.

Access BoB via our eResources A-Z page.

KanopyKanopy

Kanopy is another great resource for watching films and documentaries online, again you don’t need a TV license to access this!

It provides access to over 6,000 videos on a range of different subjects including humanities, education, the arts, business, health and sciences.

Also included are a lot of Hollywood films, British Cinema, international cinema and also early cinema.

This is a great resource and is again free to use, access Kanopy via our eResources A-Z page.

If you would like to learn about these resources or any others please contact your information consultant 

How can I find my Reading List stuff?!

So, term has started and you know you’ve got some reading to do and you need to start finding those books and articles. Well, the Library is here to help! We have a fabulous reading list systems which stores all the reading lists we receive from the department. It then links directly to the Library Catalogue to show you how many copies we have and where to find them!

This post will show you how to:

  • Find reading lists for your course
  • Use reading lists to find library resources
  • Download your reading lists

Reading List Guide

Check out our PowerPoint here to find out all you need to know about accessing and using reading lists.

Have a go yourself!

 

Check out one of your own reading lists for your course here: readinglists.rhul.ac.uk 

TIP: Try using the Course code e.g. GL1460 or the course title Igneous and Metamorphic Geology

Need help?

If you get stuck, we’re always happy to help. You can either email your Information Consultant, the Reading List Team or the Library.

Meet your Librarian – Debbie Phillips

Could you introduce yourself, and let us know your job title?

Hi, I’m Debbie. I’m the Information Consultant for Classics, History, Modern Languages, and Music.

Debbie Phillips
Debbie Phillips

How long have you been at RHUL Library?

I’m quite new! I started in January 2017, so it’s only been 9 months!

What is your role within the Library?

I’m the link between the Library and the various departments that I represent, so my role is to make sure that we have the resources that they need for teaching and research. I’m also responsible for making sure that staff & students know how to use the resources that we have, and how to evaluate the information they find. To do this I teach Information Literacy sessions.

Have you always worked in libraries?

Yes, I have (unless you count babysitting as a teenager, or my very glamorous holiday job as a booking clerk for a coach firm when I was at University).

What did you want to be when you were little?

I am pretty sure I wanted to be a ballerina. Then I had dancing lessons and it became apparent that dancing professionally wasn’t going to be the career choice for me.

Do you have any heroes and if you do, why are they your heroes?

I don’t think I do!

What did you study?

I studied Psychology right here at RHUL! Then later I did an MA in Information Services Management.

Do you have a favourite book and why?

It’s Good Omens by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman, because it’s funny, touching, apocalyptic and it makes me think about something different every time I read it.

If you had to be a superhero alter ego, what would they be names and what would your super power be?

I’m rubbish at superhero names, but I think my superpower would be telekinesis. I’d love to be able to make a cup of tea without walking over to the kettle!

Meet your Librarian – Rachel White

Could you introduce yourself, and let us know your job title?

My name is Rachel White and I am the Information Consultant for English, Media Arts, Drama & Theatre and the Centre for the Development of Academic Skills (CeDAS).

Rachel Sleeman

 How long have you been at RHUL Library?

I started at Royal Holloway in April 2016. I am looking forward to the new academic year and meeting all of the students!

 What is your role within the Library?

My role is to support several departments (English, Drama & Theatre, Media Arts and CeDAS) and to ensure the library has the resources the students and staff need. Another important part of my role is teaching information literacy skills. This involves showing users how to use resources, how to search effectively, how to recognise resources that are suitable to use and managing the information once you have found it.

 Have you always worked in Libraries?

Yes apart from a some part time jobs before and during University. I’ve worked in various libraries including a specialist library in The Met Office, Further Education Colleges and Universities.

 What did you want to be when you were little?

There was a very short period where I wanted to be a lorry driving! Not sure why this was especially as I don’t think I am the best driver, my Peugeot is plenty big enough! Since finishing University and getting my first part time post in a library as a library assistant all I have wanted to do is to work in libraries.

Long Distance Clara

 Do you have any heroes and if you do, why are they your heroes?

Not sure about hero but I do love JK Rowling! I am a massive fan of Harry Potter and the novels she has written under the guise of Robert Galbraith. I also love the fact that she has recently dropped off the Forbes billionaire list due in part to the large amounts of money she donates to various charities.

 What did you study?

I studied English Literature at Swansea University

 Do you have a favourite book, and why?

I have lots of favourite books and would struggle to pick just one! I remember there were two books that I studied at University that stayed with me. One was Dracula by Bram Stoker and the other was The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. I loved both of these texts but did struggle to sleep after reading them both!

 If you had a superhero alter ego, what would they be named, and what would your super power be?

Not sure what my superhero alter ego would be, but I definitely know what super power I would like! I would love to be able to disappear on the spot and turn up anywhere in the world instantly (apparating for any Harry Potter fans).

 Describe working in the library in 3 words

Varied, rewarding, interesting

 What advice would you give to a new student?

My advice would be to make use of the library resources and if you are unsure about anything at all contact your information consultant, we are all more than happy to help!

Meet your Librarian – Sian Downes

Sian Downes
Sian Downes

Could you introduce yourself, and let us know your job title?

My name is Sian and I am the Information Consultant for the Schools of Law, Management and Psychology.

How long have you been at RHUL Library?

I will have worked here for 3 years come October

 What is your role within the Library?

I am the Information Consultant for the Schools of Law, Management and Psychology. I liaise with academics and the departments to ensure that we have all the resources that they need for your courses. I teach Information Literacy skills to all students within those departments and also run training courses throughout the year open to all students. I help students with their research problems and when they do not know where to start for their essays.

I also help run the Library Social media accounts (follow us on Twitter @RHUL_Library)

 Have you always worked in Libraries?

Whilst I was at University I worked in a lovely ‘old man’ pub and Claire’s Accessories. Then I worked at Waterstones for 18 months before getting my first library job at the British Library when I was 24.

 What did you want to be when you were little?

A librarian (my Uncle worked The National Library of Wales and I thought it was so cool there)

What did you study?

I studied Law at undergraduate level and Information Science at Masters level

 Do you have a favourite book, and why?

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban – it is my favourite of the series

 If you had a superhero alter ego, what would they be named, and what would your super power be?

The superpower would definitely be flight. I live in South London and it would make commuting much easier if I could just fly here. I am not very imaginative with names, so I would just be The Flying Librarian

 Describe working in the library in 3 words

BEST JOB EVER

 What advice would you give to a new student?

Come and ask us anything!

and

A mug of peas made in the microwave with a little butter is a great and cheap snack.

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