Tag Archives: networking

Promoting your research using Google Scholar for your own citations

Google Scholar

My Citations is a  feature which provides a simple way for authors to keep track of citations to their articles. You can check who is citing your publications, create graphs of your citations over time, and compute several citation metrics. You can also make your profile public, so that it appears in Google Scholar results when people search for your name .

"Bibliography" by Alexandre Duret-Lutz. C BY-SA. Flickr.
“Bibliography” by Alexandre Duret-Lutz. C BY-SA. Flickr.

It is very quick to set up and simple to maintain – even if you have written hundreds of articles, and even if your name is shared by several different scholars. You can add groups of related articles, not just one article at a time; and your citation metrics are computed and updated automatically as Google Scholar finds new citations to your work on the web. You can even choose to have your list of articles updated automatically – but you can also choose to review the updates yourself, or to manually update your articles at any time.

First, create a regular Google account, or sign in to the one you already have. It is a good idea to use a personal account, not your university account, so that you can keep your profile for as long as you wish, even if you change jobs.

1. Once you’ve signed in to your Google account go to Google Scholar, select the link to My Citations. There are three stages to complete.

The Citations sign up form will ask you to confirm the spelling of your name, and to enter your affiliation, interests, etc. We recommend that you also enter your university email address, because that would make your profile eligible for inclusion in Google Scholar search results.


2. On the next page, you’ll see groups of articles written by people with names similar to yours.
Click “Add all articles” next to each article group that is yours, or “See all articles” to add specific articles from that group. I
f you don’t see your articles in these groups, click “Search articles” to do a regular Google Scholar search, and then add your articles one at a time.
3. Once you’re finished adding articles, you will be asked what to do when the article data changes in Google Scholar. You can either have the updates applied to your profile automatically, or you can choose to review them beforehand. In either case, you can always go to your profile and make changes by hand.
Finally, you will see your profile. This is a good time to make a few finishing touches – upload your professional looking photo, visit your email inbox and click on the verification link, double check the list of articles, and, once you’re completely satisfied, make your profile public.
5. Once your profile is public you can be searched for by name. Your profile will display the articles which have been collected by Google Scholar, the number of citations they have received (citations indices), and a map of your H-index.

You can also search for others by name, or by name of institution or place in the My citations screen: (NB note also the My Citations – Help feature). Run a search on ‘Royal Holloway’ (or any other institution) and see who else has registered on My Citations.

If you notice some of your articles are not in your Google Citations profile, you can sign in to your Citations profile, and select ‘Add” option from the pull down Actions menu. Search for your articles using titles, keywords, or your name. To add one article at a time, click ‘Search articles’ and then ‘Add article’ next to the article you wish to add. Your citation metrics will update immediately.

If your search doesn’t find the right article, click ‘Add Article manually’. Then, type in the title, authors etc and click ‘Save. (NB Citations to manually added articles may not appear in your profile for a while).


ISI Web of Science / Knowledge ResearcherID


This tool allows you to create an unique online profile that shows your publication history.

  1. Click on “Sign-up/Access my ResearcherID” along the right-hand side under “My ResearcherID” or click “My ResearcherID” along the top. You will be prompted to log into your ISI Web of Knowledge account with your username and password.
    2. Some of your information will be prepopulated in the Registration form. Complete any remaining fields and click the “Submit Registration” button at the bottom of the page.
    3. Accept the End User License Agreement.
    4. Registration completed.

Add your publications

1. Click on “Add Publication”
2. There are five ways of adding
publications via:
– ISI Web of Knowledge

– Web of Science®

1. Click on one of the links in “Add Publications“ to add a publication.
2. Enter last name and initials to search for records of relevant articles.
3. A list of records from the search will be shown.
4. Browse through all records and select the records for research papers you have written by clicking on “Add Selections to List”.

– Web of Science Distinct Author Set
– EndNote® Web

1. Click on the “Go to Endnote Web” link in ”Add To: My Publications” to add a publication.
2. a. If you are not currently a user, or are  not currently signed in to EndNote Web you will be prompted to register or log in. (More Information on Endnote Web is available here)
b. If you are already logged into EndNote Web via your integrated ISI Web of Knowledge or Web of Science
login, you will automatically be taken to your “My References” page.
3. Registered, logged in EndNote Web users will be taken to their “My References” page. From there you can select existing references to add to any of your 3 Publication Lists in ResearcherID. Select the references you
want to add and choose the preferred ResearcherID publication list in the “Add to group…” drop-down menu

– RIS file from EndNote, Reference Manager (RefMan) or other reference software

1. Click on one of the links in “Add Publications” to add a publication.

2. You can upload an RIS formatted text file which can be exported from EndNote, RefMan or other reference
software. The RIS format is a tagged file format for expressing bibliographic citations.

ResearcherID interactive Labs

ResearcherID includes an interactive Labs environment for exploration of author-level metrics. These tools allow for visual analysis of research networks based on:

  • Subject Category
  • Country / Territory
  • Institution
  • Author Name
  • Publication Year
  • Geographic Location

The tools include:

  • Citing Articles Network – Visually explore who is citing your published works.
  • Collaboration Network – Visually explore your collaboration associates.
  • Create a Badge – Place an image graphic on any Web site to show your membership in ResearcherID. The badge displays a real-time summary of your Profile and publications on mouse-hover.

Find Other Authors

You can also search for other authors in your field:

  1. Click on Additional Resources tab in ISI Web of Science:
  2. Select ResearcherID.com.
  3. Select a subject from the by Top Researcher Keywords. You will see a list of the most cited authors in this field. Clicking on one of the names leads to more information about the person.
  4. Try browsing one of the other categories.


Academia.edu is a platform for academics to share research papers. The company’s mission is to accelerate the world’s research.

Like LinkedInAcademia.edu focuses on professional connections. Academia.edu is essentially a LinkedIn focused on the academic world, so it provides improved features for things like listing publications. LinkedIn and Academia.edu profiles tend to feature high in Google searches, so a well-constructed profile can be a great way to develop your online brand.

You can search for people, research interests and universities to build up connections.

You can view members for Royal Holloway here.

It is about more than networking, you can search for papers and promote your own research there too. You can easily link to your papers in  Royal Holloway Research Online.

There are other sites where you can post your research profile and link to papers, which we will look at in future blog posts. It is useful to post on several of them to publicise to the biggest audience of people.

Using Twitter for Academic Research

Twitter is an excellent resource which is often underused in Academic research. Largely because of common misconceptions of Twitter including:

  • It’s only for teenagers
  • It’s all celebrities telling us what they have for breakfast
  • It’s time consuming

This is unfortunate, because Twitter is a valuable resource for academics. If you’re allowing  inaccurate stereotypes to deter you, you’re missing out.

Dorothy Bishop, Professor of Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Oxford (From Blog post: A gentle introduction to Twitter for the apprehensive academic, Tuesday 14 June 2011. Accessed 10th February 2013)

You don’t need to follow everybody, you can select who you follow so that you don’t have to know what Lady GaGa has had for breakfast.

To stop the “noise” on twitter be selective about who you follow and run keyword searches to seek information you want.

Think of it as a radio that is playing all the time in the background. You can tune in and out of it when you want to and if something particularly good has happened you can search for it – just as you could look up a radio show on BoB or iPlayer if you missed it but everyone says you should hear it.

Twitter is excellent for networking and connecting with researchers with similar interests. You can also follow most conferences on Twitter using hashtags, so even if you can’t get to a conference or seminar you can find out what is happening.

A big concern for many researchers is managing their online identity. This video from the University of Warwick explains why you don’t need to worry too much:


If you need more convincing here is a personal journey through Twitter:


When using Twitter for research it is helpful to ask effective questions. This blog post gives some advice.

We also have an introduction to Twitter here.

Further information: