Category Archives: Resource of the week

Resource of the week: New RefWorks

This week’s Resource of the Week is the new version of RefWorks.

RefWorks has recently gone through an upgrade to imporve the interface and also add some extra features. You can continue to use RefWorks (Legacy) or feel free to give RefWorks (New) a try. Some new features include being able to read documents within RefWorks and the ability to highlight and add notes to these documents

RefWorks is a web-based tool that is free to use for all staff and students. It will help you to capture, save, organise references and create bibliographies using a range of different referencing styles. You can also link it to Word and Google Docs so you can insert citations as you type and also create your bibliography within your essay.

How do I access it?

  1. Go to the Citing and Referencing Tab on your subject guide
  2. Click on “New RefWorks” from the drop down
  3. Create an account (you must use your College email address)

If you have used the previous version of RefWorks and would like to migrate your content to RefWorks (New) you can watch the short video below to find out how.

Using RefWorks

You can import information on resources from databases like Library Search, JSTOR, Science Direct and many others. Most databases will have an export to RefWorks option, for websites you can use the Ref-GrabIt tool

You will then see the option to save to RefWorks Legacy or RefWorks New, ensure you select RefWorks New.

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RefWorks creates a database of your references and you can organise these by folder.

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Use RefWorks to generate an automatic bibliography. You can insert citations and bibliography directly in your assignment using the Write and Cite tool for Word and Google Docs.

Further Help

 

Resource of the week: Bloomberg and BMC

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This week we’re teaming up with Careers to promote Bloomberg, as part of Business and Finance Week, 9th – 13th October. This month, Careers also have a challenge to complete an online course, Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC), to learn more about Bloomberg and how the world of finance operates.

Bloomberg is a financial database that was created in the early 1980s. It’s interface is quite reminiscent of this decade, but don’t let that put you off! It is a super powerful resource that can provide a whole range of information.

Bloomberg login

If Bloomberg looks familiar, that’s because you’ve probably seen it on TV and film! In fact, in the past decade it’s starred alongside Kevin Spacey (Margin Call) and Christian Bale (The Big Short).

Unlike other resources, Bloomberg is only available on certain PCs around campus.  Bloomberg terminals can be identified by the keyboard, as shown below. This special keyboard has shortcut keys to make searching simpler.

bloomberg-keyboard-4-uk-cropped

Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is a self-paced e-learning course that takes about 8 hours to complete. You can take for free on the Bloomberg terminals. It will introduce you to financial markets and some of the key functions on Bloomberg. Once completed, you will get a certificate, which you can use on your CV and LinkedIn profile. If you complete it during October, you will also get passport points, as it is the Passport Challenge for this month. If you are unsure where to start, please come to a Bloomberg Basics session in the Library, which are taking place 8am to 9am, 10th to 13th October. These will help you create a Bloomberg account and register for the BMC.

Sian Downes and Emma Burnett, Information Consultants from the Library, provide help and support with Bloomberg all year round, including training.

 

Resources of the Week: Box of Broadcast & Kanopy

Box of Broadcast (BoB): On Demand TV & Radio for Education

Our resource of the week this week is Box of Broadcasts (BoB).  BoB allows users to record items broadcast on over 65 free to air channels including BBC channels, ITV, Film 4, and 10 foreign language channels.

You can request up to 10 items a day to be recorded and added to BoB. The 9 most popular channels are listed first and programmes aired on these will be immediately recorded and added to BoB. If you would like programmes from other channels you can  request these within 30 dys of broadcast. You can also request programmes up to seven days in advance.

BoB is therefore a really good catch up service and there is no need for a TV license as the University has a license which allows students to access content via BoB.

BoB also has an archive of over 2 million broadcasts that date back to the 1990s, these include TV programmes, documentaries, films and radio broadcasts. You can also make your own playlists and create clips.

Access BoB via our eResources A-Z page.

KanopyKanopy

Kanopy is another great resource for watching films and documentaries online, again you don’t need a TV license to access this!

It provides access to over 6,000 videos on a range of different subjects including humanities, education, the arts, business, health and sciences.

Also included are a lot of Hollywood films, British Cinema, international cinema and also early cinema.

This is a great resource and is again free to use, access Kanopy via our eResources A-Z page.

If you would like to learn about these resources or any others please contact your information consultant 

Resource of the week – Box of Broadcast

BoB and kanopy

Box of Broadcast (BoB): On Demand TV & Radio for Education

Our resource of the week this week is Box of Broadcasts (BoB).  BoB allows users to record items broadcast on over 65 free to air channels including BBC channels, ITV, Film 4, and 10 foreign language channels.

You can request up to 10 items a day to be recorded and added to BoB. The 9 most popular channels are listed first and programmes aired on these will be immediately recorded and added to BoB. If you would like programmes from other channels you can  request these within 30 dys of broadcast. You can also request programmes up to seven days in advance.

BoB is therefore a really good catch up service and there is no need for a TV license as the University has a license which allows students to access content via BoB.

BoB also has an archive of over 2 million broadcasts that date back to the 1990s, these include TV programmes, documentaries, films and radio broadcasts. You can also make your own playlists and create clips.

Access BoB via our eResources A-Z page.

KanopyKanopy

Kanopy is another great resource for watching films and documentaries online, again you don’t need a TV license to access this!

It provides access to over 6,000 videos on a range of different subjects including humanities, education, the arts, business, health and sciences.

Also included are a lot of Hollywood films, British Cinema, international cinema and also early cinema.

This is a great resource and is again free to use, access Kanopy via our eResources A-Z page.

If you would like to learn about these resources or any others please contact your information consultant 

Resource of the Week: MediaPlus

It has been awhile but this week’s resource is MediaPlus.

MediaPlus is a collection over 100,000 videos, audio clips and still images that cover a variety of subjects: everything from archaeology and medicine to history, philosophy, music, drama and performing arts, media studies and the social sciences.

MediaPlus

Material on MediaPlus is freely available for use and can be downloaded, edited and shared. Just create a personal user account to start saving clips and creating playlists!

For example: Say you were researching the history of the steeplechase . A quick search brings up a number of options including this film dating from 1924 of steeplechases in nearby Eton.

Whether you just watch the film for some background to the sport or you take a screenshot to insert in your dissertation or you make a clip to show during a presentation- the possibilities with MediaPlus are endless!

Need guidance? Excellent YouTube tutorials are available that show:

MediaPlus2

MediaPlus can be found on the Library Website under A-Z Databases.

For further guidance contact your Information Consultant.

Happy browsing!

Resource Of The Week: Digimap

digimap-rgbThis week’s resource is the wonderful Digimap.

We subscribe to 5 Digimap collections: Ordnance Survey, Historic, Geology, Environment and Marine.

To begin, you just need to visit the Digimap site and log in as shown in the video below (turn on subtitles for captions):

You will then need to register to use the collections. Details of how to do this can be found on Digimap’s support pages. you will need to read and accept the terms and conditions of each one.

Each collection has two options:

  1. Roam – this is the easiest option. With Roam, you can view, annotate, print and save maps.
  2. Download – if you need to download data to GIS or CAD.

Which collection you need to use will depend on what information you need from the map. For example, if you want to know the rock types in a certain area, you will need to use the Geology collection. If you want to know how a city developed in the 20th century, you would choose Historic. The best way to discover the differences is to have a go using the collections by trying a Roam search for Poole in each one.

Digimap has an excellent YouTube Channel, with videos to help you get started.

If you have any questions about using Digimap, please contact Emma Burnett.

Have fun using Digimap!

Resource of the Week: Naxos Spoken Word Library

This week’s Resource of the Week is Naxos Spoken Word Library.

This database is made up of 100s of audio books covering a wide range of areas such as fiction, history, business, drama and much more. You are able to browse by collection, author, recent additions or search for an author/title.

The audio books are available to stream online and many copies are available in abridged and unabridged versions. You can also save your place in the audio book by setting up boomarks.

There are also audio books available in French, German and Portuguese.Capture1

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Resource of the Week: London Low Life

This week the resource of the week is London Low Life.

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This is a fascinating resource which gives you an insight into life in London during the 18th, 19th and early 20th Century. Included in this resource are digital images of rare books, interactive maps, essays and online galleries.

Explore this resource and see London as you have never seen it before!

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Resource of the Week: Eighteenth Century Drama

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Eighteenth Century Drama is a new resource at RHUL and contains a vast amount of primary sources and information relating to the theatrical world in the 18th Century.

There are 3 main parts to Eighteenth Century Drama:

  • The Larpent Collection of plays – collection of 2,500 plays submitted for license between 1778-1824, and the diaries of Larpent’s wife and professional collaborator, Anna.
  • The London Stage, 1660-1800 – this section documents theatrical performances in 18th Century London, compiled from playbills, newspapers and theatrical diaries.
  • Bibliographical Dictionary – lists London performers, from well -known names to little known musicians and performers.

This is a brilliant resource that really gives you an insight into the theatrical world of the 18th Century.

Access this resource via our eResources A-Z page. Find out more about this resource and take a tour here.

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What is the USC Shoah Archive?

The USC Shoah Foundation Institute’s Visual History Archive contains 50,000 digitized interviews with survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust. Interviews are approximately two and a half hours long and some are supplemented with photographs, documents, and artifacts pertaining to the interviewee’s family and wartime experiences.

Interviewees speak on the following topics:

  • Jewish Survivors
  • Rescuers and Aid Providers
  • Sinti and Roma Survivors
  • Liberators and Liberation Witnesses
  • Political Prisoners
  • Jehovah’s Witness Survivors
  • War Crimes Trials Participants
  • Survivors of Eugenics Policies
  • Homosexual Survivors

In April 2013, the Visual History Archive expanded to include a collection of 65 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Conducted in two countries (U.S.A. and Rwanda), and two languages (English and Kinyarwanda), this initial collection of 65 Rwandan testimonies was accomplished in collaboration with Aegis Trust and the Kigali Genocide Memorial.

In February 2014, 12 audiovisual testimonies of survivors of the 1937-38 Nanjing Massacre were integrated into the VHA. These testimonies are in Mandarin and were conducted in Nanjing, China through a partnership with the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall.

It’s a unique resource, and Royal Holloway Library is the only place in the UK with access to the collection – which means that researchers often come from far and wide to view the videos.

How do I use it?

There is a link on the Databases A-Z, under U, and once you’re on the site, you will need to create an account in order to log in, search, and view videos.

  1. Follow the link to the website
    • If on-campus, no login is needed to access the website
    • If off-campus, you will need to sign in with your Royal Holloway computer username and password
  2. Once on the website, you must register to create a personal username and password
  3. Due to high bandwidth, videos to be viewed must be downloaded to Royal Holloway’s servers rather than viewed directly from USC website.
    • Some videos already downloaded and available for immediate viewing; just click on the videos marked “Viewable now” to watch
    • Others must be requested for download. Because our server space is limited, students must get tutor’s permission before requesting a download.
  4. Once requested, the video will be added to Royal Holloway’s servers and will be available to view after 12-48 hours. Videos can only be viewed on campus, but you are able to log in and make a request for a video to be downloaded from any off-campus PC.

Searching the archive

Searching is easy, you can search on a topic, for a name, and use links in the videos to skip to particular sections relevant to your interests. The USC Shoah Foundation has a YouTube Channel with lots of information, but we’ve collected searching tips in this playlist.

Have you used the archive? Do you think it would be useful in your research? Contact library@rhul.ac.uk for more information, or leave a comment below.