Category Archives: By Subject

Browse blog posts relevant to your subject.

Social Care Online – New Interface

Social Care Online is provided by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is the UK’s largest database of information on all aspects of social care and social work.  Content includes legislation, government documents, practice and guidance, systematic reviews, research briefings, UK grey literature, digital media, books, text books and journal articles.  If you have been using Social Care Online for your research be aware that the old interface will no longer be available from the new year, instead you will need to search the new Social Care Online beta version.

How do I access Social Care Online?

Under E-Resources on the Social Work subject guide

OR

1. Go to the Databases A-Z guide on the Library subject guides

2. Go to S

3. Select Social Care Online

 

Searching on a topic

Use the standard search box to search for your topic and then filter the results by using the options on the left hand side.

 

Advanced search

To get access to advanced search features, save searches and export results you will need to first register with Social Care Online.  Once you have done this you will need to login to start searching.

The advanced search allows you to select multiple keywords which you can combine with the search operators AND, OR and NOT in the following fields:

  • Title
  • Author
  • Editor
  • Publisher
  • Publication Year
  • Subject terms
  • Location
  • Abstract

JISC Historic Books

JISC Historic Books is a database that provides access to scans of historic editions of books:

What does it contain?

BL 19th Century: Over 65, 000 recently digitised first editions from the British Library’s 19th century collection, comprising over 25 million pages of previously rare and inaccessible titles.

ECCO: Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) is a digital collection of more than 180,000 titles published in Great Britain and its colonies during the eighteenth century.

EEBO: Early English Books Online (EEBO) contains the scanned images, and plain text digital versions where available, of over 125,000 books published in English up to 1700.

Content from all three collections can be searched at once, or individual collections can be selected and browsed.

How to access the resource:

– Under E-resources on the English and Drama & Theatre subject guides.

OR

1. Go to The Databases A-Z guide on the library subject guides.

2. Go to J

3. Select JISC Historic Books

Help:

The Library has put together a basic video tutorial here:

And the website has its own Quick Reference Guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Shakespeare Collection Online

The Shakespeare Collection is an extensive collection including e-books of the most recent Arden Shakespeare editions, other editions and adaptations of Shakespeare’s works, other works published during Shakespeare’s time, prompt books, theatrical diaries, criticism, reviews, images, and reference materials. It is a great place to begin studying Shakespeare, and has lots of clever features.

How to access:

– Under E-resources on the English and Drama & Theatre subject guides.

OR

1. Go to The Databases A-Z guide on the library subject guides.

2. Go to S

3. Select Shakespeare Collection

Searching for a play

Use the basic search to find texts of Shakespeare’s plays:

shakespearecollection basic search

Under Texts – Arden editions select they play you are interested in and you can read the full text. Click on View Notes to read the Arden notes on the text.

shakespearecollection viewnotes

Comparing texts

You can also compare historical editions of texts with the recent Arden edition.

To compare the first known editions of Hamlet (1603 & 1604 Quartos) and the modern, Arden edition of the play:

  1. Open The Shakespeare Collection and go to the basic search page.
  2. Enter “Hamlet”, select the “Keyword” radio button, and click on the search button.
  3. Under the Arden tab, mark the Arden edition of Hamlet.
  4. Under the Historical tab, mark the second and third items (Quarto 1 and Quarto 2).
  5. Open Quarto 1 and click on the “Compare Documents” link.
  6. Scroll around in the left window to get a good view of the play.
  7. In the right window, open the Arden edition of the play.
  8. Scroll and compare the two versions.
  9. In the Arden edition, select “View Notes” for more information about the scene.
  10. In the top right corner of the right screen, select “Compare Another”.
  11. Open the 1604-1605 edition of the play.
  12. Page forward to get to the start of the play.

Searching for a quotation

You can use the Basic Search to find a quotation, or instances of a word or phrase.

1. Type the quotation into the search bar, and select the “Entire Document” radio button. Click Search.

shakespearecollection quotationsearch

2. Choose “First Relevant Scene”. The quotation you searched for will be displayed in red.
3. Choose the “Next” button to skip to the next instance of the word/quotation.

RHUL’s Archive Collections

RHC PH/207/9
Students in a classroom at Royal Holloway College 1899

As Library Loves… Archives month draws to a close this post will tell you a bit about the collections we hold here at Royal Holloway. If you haven’t made it to one of our Explore Your Archive sessions you may still be in the dark as to what we actually have. The collections can be split into two main groups: institutional records and special collections.

 

Institutional Records

These are records which have been created by RHUL or its predecessors.  In the 1980s Royal Holloway and Bedford Colleges merged together to form RHUL and we have the records of both the Colleges in the archives. Bedford College was the first to open (in 1849 in central London) and was the first higher education college for women in the country. Royal Holloway followed a few years later and was opened by Queen Victoria in 1886. Both collections hold records from the opening of the Colleges including foundation deeds and trust documents as well as photographs, committee minutes, papers of student societies, student and staff records, College and student publications among many other things!

We also continue to collect records from the College today so that future researchers can look back at how the College operates now. This newer material isn’t always catalogued – it’s an ongoing process! So if you want to look at something which you can’t find in the catalogue get in touch and we can see if we have it.

 

Special Collections

Different repositories use the term ‘special collection’ to mean different things (something which puzzled me a lot when I first started working in archives!) but here we call any collection that has been created/collected outside the College and then donated to us a special collection. Our special collections include rare book collections as well as archives but I’m just going to focus on the archive special collections in this post.

Our main collecting area for special collections is theatre archives. We have three collections from theatre companies – Gay Sweatshop, Half Moon and Red Shift. All three contain similar records relating to the running of the company and the productions they put on. This includes administrative and financial records, scripts, promotional material (including flyers and posters) and photographs of productions. We also have two ephemera collections: the Coton collection which contains material relating to ballet and other forms of dance including photographs, postcards and programmes; and the Roy Waters collection which is the largest of our theatre collections. Roy Waters was a theatre enthusiast who spend 40 years of his life collecting anything and everything to do with the theatre. The collection is hugely varied and includes postcards, posters, playbills, programmes, autographed letters from famous actors and actresses and much much more!

We also have the Alfred Sherman papers which cover Sherman’s role as an advisor to Margaret Thatcher and the Anselm Hughes collection which are the personal and research papers of a liturgical music scholar.

 

You can find out more about all of our collections through our website: www.rhul.ac.uk/archives which also has a link to the online catalogue and our contact details.

 

If you don’t think our collections would be of use to you in your research but would like to find other collections which would be take a look at our previous blog about finding archives in the UK: http://libraryblog.rhul.ac.uk/2013/11/14/finding-archives-uk/

Annabel Gill, College Archivist

Drama Online

Drama Online contains hundreds of plays from some of the very earliest Greek works right up to the present day. In addition there are background and contextual works on playwrights, theatre movements, genres, practitioners and periods, as well as scholarly monographs, biographies, practical books on acting and stage craft, and over five hundred theatre production stills from the Victoria and Albert Museum Performance collection.

How to access it:

Go to the Drama Subject Guide and look under E-resources.

OR

1. Go to the Databases A-Z guide on the library subject guides.

2. Go to D

3. Select Drama Online

 

Use the search bar at the top of the page to search for a play, a playwright, genre, or period – or use the links below to browse the collection.

DramaOnlinesearch

Plays: this section contains full texts of plays to read online or download.
Playwrights & Practitioners: an alphabetical list of playwrights whose biographies and works you can read in the database.
Genres: a list of different genres, and links to plays in that genre.
Periods: a list of time periods, and links to plays in those periods.
Context & Criticism: access to books on drama, theatre, playwriting.
Theatre Craft: access to books on the production and acting.

The collection will continue to grow throughout the year. For the list of titles that will be included throughout 2013, visit the Content List.

Using the database

When you are reading a play, you can hover over the text to see which page of the printed edition you are on, and where a small speechbubble appears, you can read any notes on the text

If you click on a playwright, on the right of the screen are any plays you can read, and on the left of the screen is a short biography.

dramaonline playwright

Once you have selected a genre, or period, plays in that category appear on the right of the screen, and information on the period or genre appears on the left.

dramaonline genre

You can use this to find new writers, or new movements you may be interested in.

Play Tools include a Character Grid to help you view where characters appear and with whom they interact in the play. You can select particular characters and chart their appearances through the play – or use the Words and Speeches tool to see a precise word count.

dramaonline playtools

Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary is the online version of the 20 volume dictionary, containing 60,000 words and charting the course of the English language over the past 1000 years. The online version is easier to search than the print, contains more words, and can do lots of interesting stuff!

How to access:

– Under Reference Resources in the E-resources tab on your Subject Guide

OR

1. Go to The Databases A-Z guide on the library subject guides.

2. Go to O

3. Select Oxford English Dictionary

For a really good introduction to searching, and help understanding the interface, watch this video (best viewed fullscreen)

If you want to find out where words came from, click on the links on the quotations and you can find out

  • which other words that title contributed to English
  • when it was first, and subsequently, used
  • links to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography for more information on the contributor/author
  • links to the RHUL Library catalogue

Advanced Search:

This is a very powerful search that combines all of the search functionalities available.

For example: you could combine terms, usage, dates etc to find out slang terms in 1990s, or 1690s search slang in full text + date of entry 1990-2000/1690-1700

 

Using Wildcards and the Advanced Search, or, Using the OED to solve crossword puzzles:

Using Timelines

The timelines are a way of visualising when words came into English language usage. They can be found from the OED homepage.

Although the timeline defaults to all words in the dictionary, you can refine it to subject/category

OED advanced

By region i.e. words used in an area

OEd - region

Or by origin i.e. where words came from

OED-origin

Follow the blog for essays on English Language, and try the quizzes– post your results in the comments below!

Using Key Note for Job Searching

Key Note is very useful for searching for companies to apply for.

To find Key Note go to the Databases A-Z page on the subject guides and go to K.

To see a list of the databases that contain company information visit the company information page in the subject guides under Management – Finding E-resources

This is how to find a list of companies in a particular area or industry.((You can also search for market reports – see this blog post)

1. Select Company Information from the main front pageKeynote

 

2. From the company information section select list builder

Keynote company information

3. Four options will appear (if you are unsure what the sub-headings mean hover over them to get a definition or see what is covered):

  • Fundamentals (Information including company type or currency the company reports in)
  • Financials ( including profit and loss, cash flow)
  • Geographic (where the company trades or their ultimate parent is based)
  • Advisors (the auditors or bankers the company uses)

4. click on one of the four options shown (Fundamentals, Financials, Geographic or Advisers).
5. Click “Search” on an option from left panel.
6. The “Enter Criteria” box will open to the right, Select/Enter your values.
7. Click “Count” to check the number of matches for your selection.
8. Click “Apply” to add the criteria
9. * Repeat for all the search options of your choice until complete
10. Click “Output” for all the fields you wish to output as columns in the data (this is done automatically where you have searched and applied the count)
11. Click “Export” to receive your spreadsheet or Click “Benchmark” to compare the performance of your selected companies.

To find  Telecommunication companies in the South East and London with a turnover of between £100,000 and £100,000,000 and a very strong credit score do the following search:

Fundamentals – Principal Activity search for Telecommunications

Financials – Turnover search for Min 1000 Max 1000000 (the search is for thousands)

Financials – Credit score Select very strong credit score

Geographic – Trading office address click on the map for your regions (you can click postcode areas or select the whole region buy clicking Add entire region) to select more than one region click back in the top left hand side of the map.

Select Benchmark to compare your list of companies with each other.

benchmark keynote

You can then sort your list by criteria under the following headings:

  • Size
  • Profitability
  • Liquidity
  • Gearing
  • Efficiency
  • Employee (including pay per employee)
  • Growth

 

 

 

 

Using Key Note to find Market Research reports

To Access Key Note

  1. Go to the library website: http://www.rhul.ac.uk/library 
  2. Select the Subject Guides
  3. Select the Databases A-Z tab 
  4. Select K
  5. Scroll down to find Key Note and click on the link
  6. Off campus: Enter your College username and password and click Login

Keynote

 

Select Market Research from the left hand menu.

The following options appear:

Key note market research

  •  Overview: Explains more about Key Note
  • A-Z Reports: Provides an A-Z list of all market reports
  • Market Sectors: Lists categories of reports so that you can browse by sector. For example, look under the category ‘Clothing and Personal Goods’ to find a report on ‘Sportswear’.

Key note search
Quick Search: You can also search by
keyword in the search box at the top right of
the screen. Your search will find any report
that mentions your keyword.

Key Note Report Search

 

Select Advanced Search beneath the search box for a number of options to narrow your search, such as by sector or date published. You can also search within a specific report by typing the name of the report in the ‘Report title’ box and entering your search words in the
‘Full text search’ box.

 

 

Results will be displayed as a list of report titles. You can sort results alphabetically by clicking Report Title, by date by clicking Date or by type by clicking Report Type. I

f you are browsing the A-Z list, the most recent report for each title will be shown.

Click the Key not button button to view older reports with the same title.

To view a report, click on the report title.

If you are searching by keyword, click the Key not button button to view the specific chapter where your keyword(s) appear.

Keywords will be highlighted in yellow.

Click on the main report title to go to the first page of the report, or click the chapter heading to go directly to the chapter section.

To view the report in full, go to the icons at the top right of the report:
Key note icons
To return to the results list when viewing a chapter or report click:

Key note search results

 

To save or print a report, click on the PDF icon in the top-right to open as a PDF. Save the whole PDF or print specific chapters.

Key Note

Have you seen our great new resource? It’s called Key Note and it provides market reports and company information. Even if you don’t think this resource is relevant to your studies please read on because the information contained within it could help you in that all important job search.

KeynoteResearch that works for you…

  • Analyse industry leaders
  • Substantiate business plans, marketing ideas and concepts
  • Examine current issues, market trends/developments, market size, competitive structure and marketing activity
  • Focus on a specific target market using exclusive buying behaviour and consumer research
  • Support business plans/strategies utilising Key Note’s market forecasts
  • Discover a market’s Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT Analysis)
  • Assess how trends in politics, the economy, society and technology are having an impact on a specific market (PEST analysis)

Keynote have a helpful guide to how to use the resource which we recommend people look at.

How to use Key Note to get a job

  • Research companies in the industry or region you want to work in
  • Incorporate a fact or figure from researching a company or organisation when responding to, or asking a question at, a job interview.

Meet the Library Liaison Team: Russell Burke

We wanted to find a way to introduce the Academic Liaison team to all students, both new & returning so we have created a series of videos for you to watch!

Here, Russell was interviewed about himself, his role and much more!

Russell is the Subject Librarian for Classics, History, Modern Languages, Music.

Find out more about your subjects through our subject guides.